HEALTHY KITCHEN

Are Omega-3 fatty acids good for me?

The American Heart Association explains, “Omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make. Humans must eat them through food, which means getting EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) from seafood, such as salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel or shellfish, and ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) from sources such as walnuts, flaxseed, and canola and soybean oils. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly EPA and DHA, have been shown to benefit the heart of healthy people and those at high risk for — or who already have — cardiovascular disease.”

Omega-3 fatty acids

But there's more good news.

The American Heart Association also states, “Research has shown that omega-3 fatty acids decrease risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats), which can lead to sudden cardiac death. Omega-3 fatty acids also decrease triglyceride levels, slow the growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque and lower blood pressure (slightly).”