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GreenBiz: CEOs spill their sustainability secrets

Mar 13, 2017
Pacific Seafood’s Greenshield boxes are another good example of this kind of commitment. Despite its dependence on a healthy natural environment, the seafood industry has a history of using environmentally unfriendly packaging, including polystyrene foam containers and heavily waxed — therefore, unrecyclable — boxes. To address this problem, Pacific Seafood partnered with the Georgia-Pacific manufacturing company to produce the 100 percent recyclable Greenshield boxes.

Saving money by reducing packaging waste [snippet from full article]


The Dow Chemical Company’s above-described work to address the problem of farmland degradation and wasteful land use is commendable and aligned with Dow’s stated 2025 Sustainability Goals, which include a commitment to a circular economy in which products that would once have been considered waste are recycled.

Pacific Seafood’s Greenshield boxes are another good example of this kind of commitment. Despite its dependence on a healthy natural environment, the seafood industry has a history of using environmentally unfriendly packaging, including polystyrene foam containers and heavily waxed — therefore, unrecyclable — boxes. To address this problem, Pacific Seafood partnered with the Georgia-Pacific manufacturing company to produce the 100 percent recyclable Greenshield boxes.

"They’re 100 percent biodegradable," Pacific Seafood CEO Frank Dulcich told me, "and they can be used for composting. That was us and Georgia-Pacific working together."

The Greenshieldboxes are not Pacific’s only packaging innovation aimed at reducing waste. Dulcich told me about an even more exciting development: shelf-life extension packaging.

"These animals we harvest can live anywhere from three years all the way up to 30 years. And here is the business problem: Retailers sell fresh fish out of what’s called the ‘self-service case,’ which is where you would go and buy the tray-wrapped seafood. The retailers wrap the fish throw the product away in three days. Once the product is thrown away, it is called ‘shrink.’ If the retailer has a 20 percent shrink in fresh seafood, that means they’re throwing 20 percent of their seafood away. Because of this, two things happen: One, the cost of seafood for consumers must be increased by 20 percent to equalize the loss to the retailer. And two, you’re discarding great food that somebody could have eaten.

"Shelf-life extension is a packaging technology that enables us to create for the retailer a shelf life 21 days. And we will actually be guaranteeing our customers 14 days to sell the product. With this new technology, we’re able to give the retailer a 500 percent additional selling time and provide an eating experience to the consumer that is equal to the first day the product was processed.

"In all the tests and trials we’ve completed to date, if we harvest and process the product within our vertical-integrated cold chain, every product tested achieved a minimum of 21 days of shelf life, [throughout which time] you and I could sit with our families at a meal and eat the product together and have a great experience."